Decision at Sundown

1957

Romance / Western

1
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 78%
IMDb Rating 6.9 10 1837

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
Downloaded 21,614 times
June 11, 2018 at 08:07 AM

Cast

Richard Deacon as Reverend Zaron
Karen Steele as Lucy Summerton
Ray Teal as Morley Chase
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
635.84 MB
1280*688
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 17 min
P/S 2 / 22
1.21 GB
1904*1024
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 17 min
P/S 10 / 24

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by bkoganbing 9 / 10

The Day Bart Allison Came To Sundown

This particular Budd Boetticher/Randolph Scott collaboration finds Scott as the meanest he ever was on the screen. At least since Coroner Creek where he played a similarly driven man on a vengeance quest against a man who killed his bride to be.

It's worse in Decision at Sundown. A few years earlier when Scott was away at war John Carroll took up with Scott's late wife. Now Randy with sidekick Noah Beery, Jr. has come into the town of Sundown looking to kill Carroll who has moved there and essentially taken over with his bought and paid for sheriff Andrew Duggan. Carroll by no coincidence I'm sure is getting married to Karen Steele that day, the daughter of a local rancher John Litel much to the dismay of Carroll's long time mistress Valerie French.

Scott interrupts the wedding and then he and Beery are trapped in a barn. While all this is going on a lot of the townsfolk who have let Carroll and his bully boys run roughshod over them start reexamining what's happened to their town.

Decision at Sundown shows Randolph Scott as the ugliest he ever was on the screen. He's a pretty mean hero in Coroner Creek as Chris Danning. But his character of Bart Allison in this film makes Danning look like a Boy Scout.

I can't say any more, you'll just have to see the rather unusual ending in this film and how it works out for Scott and the rest of the town of Sundown.

Let's just say he changed everyone's life, but his own.

Reviewed by krorie 7 / 10

Decision or Decisions at Sundown?

This often ignored Randy Scott western, directed by Budd Boetticher, plays almost as a dark comedy at times, though that is not the intent of the director or the writers. Scott, fine actor he was, makes every line count, enunciating effectively for full impact. He and his long-time pal--it's hinted they served together in the Confederacy during the Civil War--meet up just outside a town appropriately named Sundown. Bart Allison (Randy Scott) points his rifle at the stagecoach drivers after forcing them to let him off and tells them to get going because he and his friend Sam (Noah Beery Jr.), who just showed up to give him his horse, are headed a different direction. No sooner do they reach Sundown than they make enemies and friends by letting it be known that they do not like the groom in a wedding that's about to take place. When asked by the justice of the peace if anyone has a reason why the wedding shouldn't take place, Allison warns the groom that he is going to kill him. Then all Hell breaks loose. Allison and Sam run to the livery stable and hold up there for a large part of the movie. In the process Allison learns more than he wants to know about his deceased wife whose death he blames on the erstwhile groom.

The groom Tate Kimbrough (John Carroll) controls Sundown and the law. John Carroll was sort of a poor man's Clark Gable. Usually his acting was somewhat mediocre but when given the right part he could make it shine. One of his best roles was in the B western "Old Los Angeles" starring Wild Bill Elliott where he played a two-faced gunslinger who wormed his way to the top. Carroll does a topnotch job in "Decision at Sundown" in particular toward the end when he's determined to face Allison rather than be run out of town. The cast, made up of many film veterans such as Bob Steele, John Litel (Nancy Drew's father), Ray Teal, and Guy Wilkerson, makes a good showing. Karen Steele, who plays the frustrated bride, turns in a good performance, especially when she confronts Allison in the livery stable.

The title "Decision at Sundown" is a bit misleading. Really it should be "Decisions at Sundown," because the crux of the story centers on the denizens of the little community making their on decisions rather than be at the mercy of Tate Kimbrough and his henchmen. Yet even Kimbrough must make a momentous decision. At times the decisions made are deadly ones, such as when Sam decides to tell Allison the truth about his wife. THE decision of the title refers to Allison's. Or is it indecision? That depends on how the viewer interprets Allison's motives and moves. What he finally decides is probably the only way out for him. The best decisions are made by the citizens of Sundown. Allison and Sam serve merely as catalysts

Reviewed by alexandre michel liberman (tmwest) 8 / 10

Good Boetticher western where Scott is the ugly hero.

Randolph Scott in this film is a man obsessed with revenge. He is the ugly hero and even his loyal sidekick Noah Beery Jr. gets fed up with his obsession. At the same time his unjust cause will make him free the town from a bully (John Carrol)and his gang. It will also prevent a woman (Karen Steele) from making a mistake. For the town he will become a hero but he will hate himself for what he has done. We can compare him with James Stewart in Anthony Mann's "The Naked Spur", which was also an ugly hero. Boetticher knew how to bring out the best of Randolph Scott.He was also great in staging very well the shootouts, as he does here. Even though he was more known for working with Burt Kennedy, he thought Charles Lang, who wrote the screenplay was just as good, as mentioned in his book "When in Disgrace".

Read more IMDb reviews

0 Comments

Be the first to leave a comment