Super Fly

1972

Action / Crime / Drama

4
IMDb Rating 0 10 0

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
Downloaded 24,745 times
July 18, 2018 at 05:54 AM

Cast

Ron O'Neal as Priest
Julius Harris as Scatter
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
755.26 MB
1280*714
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 31 min
P/S 4 / 22
1.44 GB
1920*1072
English
NR
23.976 fps
1hr 31 min
P/S 1 / 25

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by aldrears1 10 / 10

CLASSIC Black Cinema

First this must be corrected. Superfly was directed by Gordon Parks Jr, not his father, Gordon Parks. Gordon Parks(who I had the pleasure of meeting) directed SHAFT! I wish the moderators of IMDb.com would more closely monitor these post-I visit the site regularly and rely on the information given as fact. Please IMDb, check the accuracy of the post, especially since you have the information on Gordon Parks here.

That being said, what makes Superfly such a great film are its imperfections-the editing, some of the spotty acting. It reads like a documentary in some ways. But the main performance of Ron O'Neal is one of the best the cinema has ever witnessed. He truly captured the paradox of Priest wanting to get out of the drug game by making one last drug deal. An Anti-hero, sure, but he knew he had to leave this lifestyle. That being said, I must say the opening scene where Priest is cruising up Park Avenue while "Freddie's Dead" is playing is extremely cool.

The Soundtrack! There are very few movies in which the Soundtrack not only propels the story forward, but also refutes any glorification of the drug lifestyle. The soundtrack serves to tell a counter-story, which works absolutely brilliantly. Curtis Mayfield is very important to me-a genius, a visionary, a humanitarian, and no one could have done a better job.

I have a cultural affinity for this film-maybe because I'm a black man, but I recommend it to all comers.

All of the main principles behind Superfly...Curtis Mayfield, Gordon Parks Jr. Ron O'Neal, Carl Lee, Charles McGregor, have all passed away. I'm so happy they were all a part of this classic piece of Cinema. The Statement that is made by this film warrants repeated viewing and consideration.

Reviewed by lambiepie-2 10 / 10

A film that influenced a generation.

Let me put in my two cents about this film.

If you weren't around when this film was released...you're going to miss much when writing a review. Let me try to help:

This film IS about an urban drug dealer that "sticks it to the man". This was NOT a known concept of that time which is why it attracted so many movie goers. What was ALSO interesting was the casting of the light skinned, straight haired actor Ron O'Neal as "Superfly" to "stick it to the man". "The Man", usually white in these films, formatically had to brace the rath of very dark skinned blacks. But here was something... different! "The Man", was really "The Law Establishment". And was "Superfly"...urban? New Concepts of the time.

Another thing: Curtis Mayfield HATED the theme of this movie. He was going to turn down writing the soundtrack when he thought it may be better to counteract this theme by writing POSITIVE messages for the audience to hear. Before "Saturday Night Fever", Curtis Mayfield wrote the ground breaking music to "Superfly". This made the film even more popular.

This was a low budget film released at the very beginning of the black film experience, and was meant to be the opposite of "Shaft" not a parellel to it. But based on the success of Shaft, Warner Bro's needed a project to enter in this arena and greenlighted "Superfly".

This film began a M-A-J-O-R fashion trend that was hard to overcome (only the Disco era of the late 70's knocked this one out.)

And that is "Superfly" in a nutshell.

"Priest", played by Ron O'Neal was 'supercool', he was slick, he had a nice existence, he was a drug dealer that you DIDN'T know was one -- not by outward appearances anyway...that didn't get his come-uppence at the end of the film, he GAVE it.

It is amazing what an impact "Superfly" had on the culture of that time. In looking at it now, it may look cheap, but it IS a timecapsule of fashion, of music and of breaking a movie taboo that all drug dealers are lowlifes and must be killed in the end.

About that fashion: This began the trend of white surban-ites dressing like pimps trying to be cool. Little white kids were wearing "maxi" coats with "Superfly" hats to Jr. High School and High School!!! Dancers were wearing platform shoes, etc., on American Bandstand!!! You think Hip-Hop did it? Where have you BEEN!!!

"Superfly" is one of the rare films that you must experience beyond judging it on how good or bad it is to watch...Rent this film to see how a film can INFLUENCE a culture.

Reviewed by thomaswatchesfilms 9 / 10

Interesting and realistic perspective

This gritty, low budget film offers a unique and honest perspective on the underworld of black street life in the early 1970s, with an almost tragic, Shakepearian, bent. The look, the feel and language of the culture and the almost real-time look street life in NYC of that era is truly unmatched by any film before or since. Perhaps through genius, inspiration, maybe just plain luck, or all three, the producers and director hit the nail right on the head. Starring an excellent, intelligent cast of professional thespians, some with impressive stage and film credentials, and augmented by a wonderful infusion of genuine non-professionals right from the street in key roles, the film has an honesty and gritty reality that belies its budgetary constraints. Filmed largely without the permission of local authorities and unions, in winter and often after dark, it has a cinema verite feel throughout; almost a documentary. And the score! Composed and performed by Curtis Mayfield, it is as close to an utter classic as has ever been offered. It stands alone, and would have been a multi-platinum offering even without the film. If one takes the inherent flaws to this type of production; i.e. the rough editing, slightly uneven performances and almost clandestine feel, and places these in proper perspective, it is sure to delight all but the most hardened and jaded enthusiasts of film. Notable: this film set THE STYLE for black, urban culture for most of the next decade. It has no current rivals in that accomplishment. After this film, simply everything since has been empty posturing vis-a-vis popular rap music. It was "remade" during the mid 1990s and set in Miami as "Big Ballers", which was utterly horrible. Compare the two and you will see what style counts for. This film is the real deal. I spent money I didn't have to get this DVD. Go buy it, trust me.

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